Google Sets New Internet Traffic Record

By: Craig Labovitz -

In their earnings call last week, Google announced a record 2010 third-quarter revenue of $7.29 billion (up 23% from last year). The market rejoiced and Google shares shot past $615 giving the company a market cap of more than $195 billion.

This month, Google broke an equally impressive Internet traffic record — gaining more than 1% of all Internet traffic share since January. If Google were an ISP, as of this month it would rank as the second largest carrier on the planet.

Only one global tier1 provider still carries more traffic than Google (and this ISP also provides a large portion of Google’s transit).

In the graph below, I show a weighted average percentage of Internet traffic contributed by the search / mobile OS / video / cloud giant. As in earlier posts, the Google data comes from 110+ ISPs around the world participating in ATLAS. The multiple shaded colors represent different Google ASN and reflect ongoing global traffic engineering strategies.

googletraffic

Google now represents an average 6.4% of all Internet traffic around the world. This number grows even larger (to as much as 8-12%) if I include estimates of traffic offloaded by the increasingly common Google Global Cache (GGC) deployments and error in our data due to the extremely high degree of Google edge peering with consumer networks. Keep in mind that these numbers represent increased market share — Google is growing considerably faster than overall Internet volumes which are already increasing 40-45% each year. More data on general Internet growth trends is available in some of our earlier papers and blog posts.

While its not news that Google is Big, what is amazing is how much bigger Google continues to get.

A quick analysis of the data also shows Google now has direct peering (i.e. not transit) with more than 70% of all providers around the world (an increase of 5-10% from last year). In fact, the only remaining major group of ISPs without direct Google peering are several of the tier1s and national PTTs — many of whom will not settlement-free peer with Google due to regulatory prohibitions or commercial strategy.

While the business press may debate Google’s future (i.e. can it expand beyond search and continue its earnings growth?), for now Google’s traffic growth continues apace with massive corresponding impact on the network topology, peering arrangements and the overall Internet infrastructure.

 
- Craig
 
 

Comments

  1. I agree. I thought that everyone was already using google, so it’s weird seeing their usage still growing at a significant rate. As opposed to facebook, who is also showing amazing growth each month, because they’re still rapidly expanding user base as more people finally give in and sign up. You should do one of these for facebook.

  2. This does not include YouTube traffic does it? YouTube is said to represent upwards 50% of global internet traffic (excluding BitTorrent).

    Can anyone confirm that this does not include YouTube? And if YouTube is included, then which percentage of Google’s traffic is YouTube based?

  3. What fraction of Google’s traffic is YouTube? Streaming video generates a lot more traffic than serving up search results.

  4. Craig Labovitz 10/25/2010, 2:44 pm

    To David’s point, most of this traffic is due to YouTube / video.

    And we showed some data for Facebook in an earlier blog post:
    /asert/2010/04/the-battle-of-the-hyper-giants-part-i-2/

  5. Mark Adams,

    everyone is not using google already(well maybe in US, but not everyone in the world). There are two billion internet connected devices in the world and only 1 billion is using google search as per google. Google still has room to grow even in search. And with mobile devices, cloud computing etc, google traffic is only going to increase not decrease.

  6. Bernd Schanz 10/26/2010, 5:48 am

    Who is the Tier 1 which is bigger than google?!

    1. Craig Labovitz 10/26/2010, 7:47 am

      Given commercial sensitivities, we are not disclosing any rankings of other providers. Though most backbone engineers would probably have the right guess.

  7. jaak defour 10/26/2010, 8:32 am

    If I understand it well, the 6,4% measurement is based on a subset of Google IP Transit connections. Of all the traffic on IP Transit connections that you measured, 6,4% are from Google, correct?

    The traffic on the Google – LocalISP peering connections (majority of their traffic) and the traffic coming out of their Global caches was not taken into account, correct?

    1. Craig Labovitz 10/26/2010, 5:23 pm

      Jaak — the 6.4 is a weighted average of percent of traffic across the 110 ISPs to and from Google ASN. This estimate includes both transit and private / direct peering traffic with Google.
      We do not include GGC traffic in this number (and only have very limited visibility into GGC traffic).

      More detail about the methodology is available in our SIGCOMM paper (both paper and slides at): http://conferences.sigcomm.org/sigcomm/2010/conf-program.php

  8. @Bob, Sorry if it wasn’t as obvious as I expected that I didn’t mean “everyone” was using google, but that they have enough usage already that I wouldn’t expect any gains to be rapid. I think you may be the only one talking about the search engine market.

    @Craig, I had seen info based on that, but hadn’t realized the source. Thanks.

  9. I think there are two billion internet connected devices in the world and only 1 billion is using google search as per google. Google still has room to grow even in search.

  10. Please note the article on “Google Snaffling 6.4% of Global Online Traffic” is now located at http://www.koozai.com/blog/search-engine-news/google/google-snaffling-6-4-of-global-online-traffic/

  11. everyone is not using google already(well maybe in US, but not everyone in the world). There are two billion internet connected devices in the world and only 1 billion is using google search as per google. Google still has room to grow even in search. And with mobile devices, cloud computing etc, google traffic is only going to increase not decrease.